If you are coming to the end of your mortgage, credit card or loan payment holiday, we will contact you before it ends, there is no need to call us. You can use our coronavirus support tool to find the right solution for your needs and confirm what you would like to do in a few simple steps.

 

Getting married brings the start of a new chapter with your partner. It’s important to consider what tying the knot means for you as your lives come together, practically and financially.

Talking openly with your future husband or wife about the impact of marriage on your finances is important. Having regular, honest conversations about your finances is a good way to gain an understanding of your different views towards money and savings. You might have different attitudes to taking on debt, for instance, or to budgeting and spending. Being open about these areas can help to reduce the risk of conflict and help you both make better decisions together.

We’ve worked with Relate to produce a wealth of content to support you and your partner in having important and constructive money conversations. For more help or support with any money worries visit The Money Advice Service website, part of the Single Financial Guidance Body, for further information.

Starting the conversation

Below you'll find some valuable tips from Relate, the leading relationship support charity, to help make M-word conversations easier for you to have.

6 tips to help you start conversations

1. Start talking about ‘our money’.

Consider tweaking your language to talk about ‘our money’ rather than ‘my money’.  This doesn’t mean that sharing all your money will be the right thing for you, but it will help you to feel like a team and reflects the commitment you’ve made to each other. 

2. Talk about your future goals.

This exciting time means you’ll probably be talking about plans for the future. When you do this, make sure to factor in how you’ll save for things- it will make it more realistic that they’ll actually happen.

3. Discuss roles and responsibilities.

Talk about your strengths and skills. Who will be responsible for the budget and arrange direct debits so that bills are paid? If one person is going to lead, how will you ensure the other person is kept informed?

4. Schedule in regular money catch-ups.

Dedicated time to go over your finances will help you keep on top of things and provide the opportunity to raise any issues there might be. They could be weekly, monthly or quarterly, depending on your needs.

5. Have the joint account conversation.

Joint accounts aren’t for everyone, but it’s a good idea to have a chat about whether this is something you want to consider if you haven’t already.

6. Talk transparency.

Not being honest about money can cause real issues, but it’s also important for many people to feel they have some independence. Talk through what level of transparency is right for you. Be honest about any debts you’re bringing into the marriage. 

Laura and Adam’s Wedding Saving Tips