Latest scams

Fraudsters are always looking for new ways to try to steal your details and money.

Discover which scams are common right now, how they work and the steps you can take to stay safe.

Loan fee scam

Fraudsters are taking advantage of people who need money by offering fake loans for an upfront fee. Find out how you can avoid this scam and keep your money safe.

Energy scam

Beware of texts claiming to be from the government offering you money off your energy bills. Learn how this scam works so you can spot and avoid it.

Scams through WhatsApp

Do you really know who sent a message from an unknown number?

Find out how fraudsters are trying to scam you by using messaging apps like WhatsApp to pretend to be someone you know.

Discover more latest scams…

Scam emails

British Gas

How does it work?

An email claiming to be from British Gas offers a refund if you click on a link.

It won’t address you by name, and may have spelling or grammar mistakes. And the sender’s email address will be fake.

How to avoid this scam

If you get an email like this, don’t reply or click on any link. Just delete it.

To check if a British Gas email is genuine, call them on a number you trust, not one from a message.

To report the scam email to British Gas, forward it to phishing@centrica.com

Contact us right away if you clicked on the link and made a payment or shared your banking details.

Working from home

How does it work?

An email claims to be from your employer’s IT support department.

It says you need new VPN configuration details and wants you to click on a link to get them.

The link goes to a fake Microsoft 365 logon page to try to steal your personal or banking details.

How to avoid this scam

If you get an email like this, don’t click on the link or reply, just delete it.

Fraudsters can copy email addresses to make a message seem genuine.

Council Tax

How does it work?

An email claims to come from the Government Digital Service Team. It offers a Council Tax Reduction for people on a low income, or who get benefits.

To claim the refund, you have to click a link. But this goes to a fake page to try to get you to give away banking details.

How to avoid this scam

If you get an email like this, don’t reply or click on the link. Just delete it.

Learn more about scam messages

Learn more about scam messages

There could be scam emails in your inbox. We’ll guide you on how to tell if it’s genuine or not and the steps to take to stay safe.

Scam messages

Social media scams

Bank card refund

How does it work?

Fraudsters can use social media to offer refunds for recent card payments.

If you reply, they’ll ask for your Lloyds Internet Banking details and will use them to set up a new mobile device on your account.

The fraudster then uses our Mobile Banking app to dispute a genuine payment.

If you get a refund, they can try to steal it through the app, or ask you to make a new payment to their account.

How to avoid this scam

If you see a social media post like this, don’t reply. Report it on the platform.

Never share your Lloyds Internet Banking details with anyone. If you have, contact us right away.

Bitcoin

How does it work?

Fraudsters use social media to offer Bitcoin (BTC) deals.

They often promise to double your money if you pay directly to a BTC address. But they’ll keep anything you send.

How to avoid this scam

If you see a social media post or get a message about Bitcoin, don’t reply. Report it on the platform, then delete it.

Learn more about social media scams

Learn more about social media scams

Fraudsters use social media to scam people. We can guide you on how to use social media to keep your details and money safe from scams.

Social media scams

Scam texts

Royal Mail

How does it work?

A text claims to be from Royal Mail to say a parcel is awaiting delivery. To get it you need to click on a link to pay a fee.

The link goes to a fake Royal Mail page that wants your personal and banking details.

If you’re expecting a delivery, Royal Mail won’t get in touch to ask for your personal or banking details. 

How to avoid this scam

If you get a text like this, don’t click on the link or reply. Just delete it.

You can report a scam text for free to 7726.

COVID-19 test

How does it work?

A text claims to be from NHS Test and Trace to say you’ve been in contact with someone with COVID-19. It wants you to click on a link to order and pay for a test.

The link goes to a fake site and you only have to pay a small amount. But the fraudsters are after your personal and banking details to pretend to be your bank later on with a scam call.

How to avoid this scam

If you get a text like this, don’t reply or click on a link. Just delete it.

NHS Test and Trace is no longer in use.

Contact us right away if you made a payment or shared your details.

You can report a scam text for free to 7726.

SIM swap

How does it work?

Fraudsters can call or text to pretend to be your mobile phone provider. They may ask you to verify a message with a code, or click a link to enter a code online.

Another trick is to use your personal details to call your provider to either:

  • swap your number to a new SIM card on the same network, or
  • move your number to another network by asking for a Porting Authorisation Code (PAC).

How to avoid this scam

If you get a call that wants a code, hang up. If it’s a text, delete it.

Never give anyone who calls or texts you a code, or enter it online for them.

If your phone suddenly stops letting you make calls or send texts, contact your provider on a number you trust right away.

You can report a scam text for free to 7726.

Learn more about scam messages

Learn more about scam messages

Anyone can get a scam text. Read our guide to find out the tricks fraudsters use to send scam texts and how you can stay safe from them.

Scam messages

Scam calls

Amazon call

How does it work?

You get a phone call out of the blue that claims to be from Amazon. It could be about one of these things:

  • A refund.
  • Problem with your account.
  • Use of your account.

They may know some details about you or your Amazon account. And could say it’s the Amazon Fraud Team, or your bank account is the problem.

What they want is for you to download something to your device. 

How to avoid this scam

If you get a call like this, hang up the phone. Amazon will never call to ask you to download something.

It’s very rare for Amazon ever to call you about anything. If they do, they’ll never ask for personal or banking details, or to offer a refund.

SIM swap

How does it work?

Fraudsters can call or text to pretend to be your mobile phone provider. They may ask you to verify a message with a code, or click a link to enter a code online.

Another trick is to use your personal details to call your provider to either:

  • swap your number to a new SIM card on the same network, or
  • move your number to another network by asking for a Porting Authorisation Code (PAC).

How to avoid this scam

If you get a call that wants a code, hang up. If it’s a text, delete it.

Never give anyone who calls or texts you a code, or enter it online for them.

If your phone suddenly stops letting you make calls or send texts, contact your provider on a number you trust right away.

Carphone Warehouse

How does it work?

You get a call that claims to be Carphone Warehouse offering you a phone upgrade.

If you agree, they’ll place an order using your personal and banking details. But the wrong phone is delivered to your address.

You contact the person who called, often through WhatsApp, to return the phone by post. Once they have it, they’ll disappear. You don’t get a phone, but still have to pay the contract.

How to avoid this scam

If you get a call like this, hang up the phone. Carphone Warehouse will never call to offer you an upgrade.

It’s very rare for Carphone Warehouse ever to call you about anything. If they do, they’ll never offer an upgrade or ask for personal or banking details.

Learn more about scam calls

Learn more about scam calls

Could you tell if it’s a fraudster on the phone? We’ll show you the tell-tale signs and how to react so you can stay safe from scam calls.

Scam calls

App scams

Google Play virus

How does it work?

Fraudsters are hiding viruses in apps on Google Play. It could be any kind of app, such as one for a QR code.

A fake app can look genuine, but it may not install or work after you download it.

This virus can cause serious harm to a device and steal personal data.

How to avoid this scam

Make sure an app is safe before you download, by:

  • Checking reviews.
  • Reading the permissions. Do they match the app’s purpose?
  • Reading the terms and conditions.

Install an anti-virus on your device or ask a phone shop to do it for you. Use it to scan for viruses and follow its advice.

Android app virus

How does it work?

Fraudsters can hide a virus on any kind of Android app. It could look genuine, but may not install or work after you download it.

This virus can cause serious harm to a device and steal personal data.

How to avoid this scam

Make sure an app is safe before you download, by:

  • Checking reviews.
  • Avoiding third-party marketplaces.
  • Using genuine websites.
  • Reading the permissions. Do they match the app’s purpose?
  • Reading the terms and conditions.

Install an anti-virus on your device or ask a phone shop to do it for you. Use it to scan for viruses and follow its advice.

Two factor authentication (2FA)

How does it work?

Fraudsters put a fake 2FA app on Google Play, that’s now been removed. The app looked genuine and provided a real service. But once downloaded, it put a virus on your device.

This virus will gain access to everything on your device. It will then try to steal your banking details to target you with a scam later on. 

How to avoid this scam

If you got this app, delete it right away.

Check your bank or credit account to make sure you know what’s been paid in and out. And look for any other charges that you didn’t make.

If you spot anything odd, contact us right away.

Learn more about app scams

Learn more about app scams

Do you know how to keep your devices safe? Our guide can help you to protect your devices and personal details from viruses and scams.

App scams

Have you been targeted by fraudsters?

Have you been targeted by fraudsters?

Contact us right away to report a scam. We can then guide you on what to do next.

Contact us now
  • Take Five

    You can get straight forward, impartial advice on how to avoid scams from Take Five.

    Action Fraud

    You can report a crime or get general advice from Action Fraud. They help banks and other companies combat fraud.

    Get Safe Online

    They offer advice on how to keep yourself and your devices safe from fraud.

    UK Finance

    UK Finance is there to support customers and to help make sure it's safe to bank.

    Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA)

    The PRA is part of the Bank of England. Their role is to make sure banks act safely and reduce the chance of them losing money.

    Financial Conduct Authority (FCA)

    The FCA is there to make sure banks work well so customers are protected and get a fair deal.

    CIFAS

    CIFAS can help to protect your identity. They can stop fraudsters from using your details to apply for things in your name.

    Cyber Aware

    This is a government site that gives advice on how to stay safe online.

    ScamSmart

    This is part of the FCA site. You can use it to check on an investment or pension deals to help you avoid scams.

    Lloyds Bank does not control the content of third party websites linked to on this page.

Important legal information

Lloyds Bank plc. Registered office: 25 Gresham Street, London EC2V 7HN. Registered in England and Wales No. 2065. Lloyds Bank plc is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority under registration number 119278.

Eligible deposits with us are protected by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS). We are covered by the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS).

Personalisation. We will always greet you personally using your Title and Surname. We will never use ‘Dear User’ or ‘Dear Valued Customer’. Where you hold an existing account with us, we will quote the last four digits of your account number, such as your current account, savings account or credit card. If you don’t yet have an account with us but we have your postal address details, we may use part of your postcode. Internet Banking-related emails may also include your Internet Banking User ID.

Links. All links within our emails will go to a page on www.lloydsbank.com, or to trusted Government regulatory websites (e.g. Financial Ombudsman, Financial Conduct Authority, etc). Research emails may take you to a partner research company website but you will not be asked for any Internet Banking log on details.

In fraudulent emails, website addresses may appear genuine on first sight, but if you hover your mouse over the link without clicking, it may reveal a different web address. On our genuine emails the link address always starts with email.lloydsbank.com or www.lloydsbank.com. We will never link direct through to our Internet Banking log on page or to a page that asks for your security or personal details.