The challenging times we’re all experiencing means we’re getting a lot more calls than usual and our call times are longer. So we can support people in the most vulnerable situations, we ask that you only call us if your enquiry is urgent. You can still use our online and mobile banking services and our automated service.

 

Latest scams

Scams come in all shapes and sizes, from dodgy emails to fake sites. And they keep changing to try and trick you. Stay one step ahead by learning about the latest scams.

  • Coronavirus scam

    What to look out for

    People are using the coronavirus outbreak as an opportunity to try new scams by email, call and text.  

    One email has a PDF document with up-to-date advice on the outbreak. This is likely to be a scam

    The document could contain a computer virus to infect your device. This will then try to steal your personal or payment details.

    What you should do

    • Don’t open emails if you don’t know who sent them.
    • Even if you know the sender, don’t reply if an email looks odd. 
    • Look out for spelling mistakes and a messy layout. 
    • Don’t click on any links or attachments unless you know they’re safe.
    • If you’re not sure about an email, call the sender using a number from their site. Don’t call the number in an email or pop up.

    Find out more about scam messages.

    Coronavirus scams even use online marketplaces such as Facebook to sell goods like face masks and hand sanitisers that don’t exist.

    Before you buy anything online it’s best to do some research and check buyer reviews to make sure a seller is genuine. And always pay by card - that way you protect your cash.

    Find out more about buying from online shops.

  • Fake DVLA texts

    What to look out for

    There’s been an increase in DVLA scams online. 

    The most popular scam is by text message. It will tell you that you’re owed a refund and ask you to click on a link. The link will take you to a page which asks for personal or account details. 

    This is likely to be a scam to try and steal your details.  

    What you should do

    • Be careful about opening texts that you didn’t expect.
    • Don’t click on any links or attachments unless you’re sure they are genuine.
    • If you’re unsure, call the DVLA. Use a number from their website, not one from a text.

     

Social Media scams

  • Facebook bait and switch scams

    What to look out for:

    Fraudsters are using social media posts to send fake links to viral videos. These will appear as shared posts on popular places like Facebook. This is a bait and switch scam. The link goes to a fake site with a video. But a pop-up will ask you to update your video player with a download. The download will infect your device with a virus to steal personal and banking details. It will also send the fake post to your friends to try and scam them too.

    What you should do:

    • If you’re not sure who a person is on social media, then don’t connect with them. Some accounts are fake and just try to steal details.
    • Don’t click on any links or attachments unless you know they’re safe.
    • Make sure a site is safe before you give personal details.

    Find out more about staying safe on social media

     

  • Free supermarket voucher scam

    What to look out for

    You might see a free voucher offer on Facebook from Morrisons or Tesco. It looks real and says it's for 'Today only'. But it's a scam. The link takes you to a fake website to fill in a survey. Then to get the voucher you have to click on another fake link and share your personal details. There are no vouchers. And your details could be used to try and defraud you at a later date.

    What you should do

    • Make sure a site is safe before you give personal details.
    • Ignore sites and emails that offer free things if you give your personal details.
    • Tell friends and family about this scam, especially if they shop at those stores.
    • Don’t click on any links or attachments unless you know they’re safe.
  • PayPal social media scams

    What to look out for:

    You may see fake PayPal social media posts that ask you to enter a prize draw. These will appear as promoted or shared posts on popular places like Facebook. They will ask you to follow a link to log on. This is a scam. The link will lead to a fake site to try and steal your personal details.

    What you should do:

    • If you’re not sure who a person is then don’t connect with them. Some accounts are fake and just try to steal details.
    • Don’t click on any links or attachments unless you know they’re safe.
    • Make sure a site is safe before you give personal details.
    Example of PayPal social media scam

Scam messages

  • Apple ID email scams

    What to look out for:

    You may get an email that looks like it comes from Apple. It will tell you that your card has been used to order something. The subject of the email could be either ‘Receipt ID’, ‘Receipt Order’ or ‘Payment Statement’. This is a scam. The email is fake and will try to get you to follow a link or attachment to cancel the order. The scam will try to steal your personal and banking details.

    What you should do:

    • Don’t open emails if you don’t know who sent them.
    • Check the sender’s email address to make sure it’s genuine.
    • Don’t click on any links or attachments unless you know they’re safe.
    • If you’re not sure about an email, call the sender using a number from their site. Don’t call the number in an email or pop-up.
    Example of Apple ID email scam
    Example of an Apple ID scam
  • Apple ID text scams

    What to look out for:

    Fraudsters are sending texts which look like they’re from Apple. It will tell you that your account has been locked and to click on a link to unlock it. This is a scam. The link takes you to a fake page to try and steal your personal or banking details.

    What you should do:

    • Be careful about opening texts that you didn’t expect.
    • Don’t click on any links or attachments unless you know they’re safe.
    • If you’re not sure about a text, call the sender using a number from their site. Don’t call the number in a text.
    Example of Apple ID text scam
  • British Gas email scam

    What to look out for

    You could get an email that looks like it's from British Gas. It will say that your latest payment by direct debit didn't go through and your gas supply could be cut off. They want you to click on a link to check and update your payment details. This is a scam. The link is to a fake site to try and get your personal or payment details.

    What you should do

    • Don't open emails if you don't know who sent them.
    • Check the sender's email address to make sure it's genuine.
    • Don't click on any links or attachments unless you know they're safe.
    • If you're not sure about an email, call the sender using a number from their site. Don't call the number in an email or pop up.

    Find out more about scam messages

     

  • Google calendar email scam

    What to look out for:

    Fraudsters are sending fake emails that include a Google calendar invite. The subject of the event is in Russian and has a link to a video call. This is a scam. The link is there to try and steal your personal or banking details, or to infect your device. Your spam filter should pick this scam up. But to help protect yourself, you can follow these steps:

    1. Open Google Calendar settings.
    2. Go to Event Settings, find Automatically Add Invitations and select the option ‘No, only show invitations to which I've responded.’
    3. Also, under View Options, make sure that ‘Show declined events’ is unchecked, so scam events don’t appear after they’re declined.

    What you should do:

    • Don’t open emails if you don’t know who sent them.
    • Check the sender’s email address to make sure it’s genuine.
    • Don’t click on any links or attachments unless you know they’re safe.
    • If you’re not sure about an email, call the sender using a number from their site. Don’t call the number in an email or pop-up.
    Example of Google calendar email scam
  • PayPal email scams

    What to look out for:

    Fraudsters are using emails that look like they come from PayPal. The most common message will tell you that there’s a ‘problem with your account’. It will include a link to follow to sort the problem out. This is a scam. The link will take you to a fake PayPal site to try and steal your personal or banking details, or to infect your device with a virus.

    What you should do:

    • Don’t open emails if you don’t know who sent them.
    • Check the sender’s email address to make sure it’s genuine.
    • Don’t click on any links or attachments unless you know they’re safe.
    • If you’re not sure about an email, call the sender using a number from their site. Don’t call the number in an email or pop-up.
    Example of a PayPal email scams

    Another fake PayPal email will tell you that ‘you’re a prize winner’. But to collect your prize you must pay a small handling fee. This is also a scam.

    Example of a PayPal email scams
  • Royal Mail message scam

    What to look out for

    You could get an email or a text that looks like it's from Royal Mail. It will say that they couldn't deliver a parcel and will give a tracking number. They want you to click on a link to confirm the parcel or pay a fee. This is a scam. The link is to a fake site to try and get your personal or payment details.

    What you should do

    • Don't open emails if you don't know who sent them.
    • Check the sender's email address to make sure it's genuine.
    • Don't click on any links or attachments unless you know they're safe.
    • If you're not sure about an email, call the sender using a number from their site. Don't call the number in an email or pop up.

Think you've been a victim of fraud?

You should contact us right away if you think you’ve been a victim of fraud. We can then guide you on what to do next.

Contact us now

Important legal information

Lloyds Bank plc. Registered office: 25 Gresham Street, London EC2V 7HN. Registered in England and Wales No. 2065. Lloyds Bank plc is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority under registration number 119278.

Eligible deposits with us are protected by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS). We are covered by the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS).

Personalisation. We will always greet you personally using your Title and Surname. We will never use ‘Dear User’ or ‘Dear Valued Customer’. Where you hold an existing account with us, we will quote the last four digits of your account number, such as your current account, savings account or credit card. If you don’t yet have an account with us but we have your postal address details, we may use part of your postcode. Internet Banking-related emails may also include your Internet Banking User ID.
Links. All links within our emails will go to a page on www.lloydsbank.com, or to trusted Government regulatory websites (e.g. Financial Ombudsman, Financial Conduct Authority, etc). Research emails may take you to a partner research company website but you will not be asked for any Internet Banking log in details. In fraudulent emails, website addresses may appear genuine on first sight, but if you hover your mouse over the link without clicking, it may reveal a different web address. On our genuine emails the link address always starts with email.lloydsbank.com or www.lloydsbank.com. We will never link direct through to our Internet Banking log in page or to a page that asks for your security or personal details.