Investment scams

It takes time and research to find a good investment. Fraudsters make it easy for you to find one that’s a scam.

Protect your money. Learn how fraudsters create scams to make easy money or offer long term investment deals that are too good to be true.

  • Long-term investment scam

    Fraudsters can take their time to build a relationship with you as a client. This helps them to gain your trust so you feel comfortable handing over money.

    Fraudsters pretend to be genuine companies or advisers

    Would you trust an investment if a person was professional and claims to be from a real company? What if they sent paperwork and gave you technology like an app to track your investment? Check the register of genuine companies and advisers on the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) site.

    Fraudsters copy genuine websites

    If you follow a link on a social media post, direct message or email, it could go to a fake site. Always use the FCA to find a company’s genuine website address and contact details. Talk with them in person to check they’re genuine and an investment offer is real.

    How do they want you to pay?

    Fraudsters want you to transfer money to a bank account, as it’s like handing over cash and very hard for you to recover. They can also ask you to send money to accounts that they control on genuine apps and websites. If you question fraudsters about an investment, they may reassure you or confuse you with jargon. They could stop all contact if they think you suspect it’s a scam. Get a second opinion. Learn everything about a deal before you invest.

    Have you done any research or got advice?

    Spend time researching an investment to find out if it’s real and worth your money. Talk with family and friends, or find an independent financial adviser. And use the scam warning list on the FCA website.

    Did you expect an offer to invest?

    Fraudsters can email, text or call you to offer an investment. Your details may have been stolen. Or did you enter them online to find out more? If a fraudster knows things about you and your finances, it can help them to convince you that they’re genuine.

    Common investment scams offer things such as precious gems like diamonds, or metals like gold, wine, land abroad, energy and cryptocurrencies, for example Bitcoin.

Make easy money

Social media is a common place for fraudsters to offer scam investments promising quick returns that you won’t find elsewhere. These often involve cryptocurrency, but could be anything to tempt you. In the end, it’s just a quick way to lose your money.

This is an image of a person’s social media profile offering to double your money if you invest in cryptocurrency.

Fraudsters create social media profiles

Anyone can create a social media profile. Fraudsters use them to post fake investment deals or to start up a conversation with you. They might promise to make you money and try to convince you by showing you fake success stories. But you’ll never get a penny back from them, they’ll just want more money.

Did somebody recommend an investment?

Fraudsters can hack accounts or copy images of celebrities. It might appear that a social media friend or a famous person is recommending a deal. But that doesn’t make it real. They want you to believe it’s an easy way to make money.

Do you have to pay right away?

Often, fraudsters will put you under pressure to invest. They promise a quick return on your money or give short deadlines to influence you. If they can force you into a fast decision, it might stop you from checking a deal is genuine. Be suspicious if they push you to invest. Research an investment, a company or adviser before making up your mind.

Have you done any research or got advice?

Spend time researching an investment to find out if it’s real and worth your money. Talk with family and friends, or find an independent financial adviser. Check the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) register of genuine companies and advisers, and their scam warning list. Always use the FCA to get contact details like phone numbers and links to a company’s website.

How do they want you to pay?

Fraudsters want you to transfer money to a bank account, as it’s like handing over cash and very hard for you to recover. If you question a fraudster about a deal, they’ll try to reassure you or use jargon that’s hard to understand. They may stop all contact if they feel you know it’s a scam. Get a second opinion. Learn as much as you can about a deal before you invest.

Always do lots of research, especially if you're a new investor. Use sites like the FCA and MoneySavingExpert for help.

If you invest in cryptocurrency, the Financial Services Compensation Scheme can’t protect your money.

Other scams fraudsters use to trick you

Learn the methods fraudsters use to steal house deposits and pension savings, or when you buy online.

Mortgage scams

How to protect your house deposit from scams.

Keep your deposit safe

Pension scams

Did you know fraudsters can target your pension?

Protect your pension

Buying online scams

Fraudsters sell fake items online or ones that don’t exist.

Buy online safely

Learn about the latest scams

Fraudsters are always looking for new ways to try to steal your details and money. Discover which scams are common right now.

Go to latest scams

Have you been targeted by fraudsters?

Contact us right away if you think you've been scammed. We can then guide you on what to do next.

Contact us now

Eligible deposits with us are protected by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS). We are covered by the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS).

Personalisation. We will always greet you personally using your Title and Surname. We will never use ‘Dear User’ or ‘Dear Valued Customer’. Where you hold an existing account with us, we will quote the last four digits of your account number, such as your current account, savings account or credit card. If you don’t yet have an account with us but we have your postal address details, we may use part of your postcode. Internet Banking-related emails may also include your Internet Banking User ID.

Links. All links within our emails will go to a page on www.lloydsbank.com, or to trusted Government regulatory websites (e.g. Financial Ombudsman, Financial Conduct Authority, etc). Research emails may take you to a partner research company website but you will not be asked for any Internet Banking log on details.

In fraudulent emails, website addresses may appear genuine on first sight, but if you hover your mouse over the link without clicking, it may reveal a different web address. On our genuine emails the link address always starts with email.lloydsbank.com or www.lloydsbank.com. We will never link direct through to our Internet Banking log on page or to a page that asks for your security or personal details.

Stay scam safe

Learn how to spot and avoid scams, and how to report fraud.

Protect yourself from fraud

Stay scam safe

Learn how to spot and avoid scams, and how to report fraud.

Protect yourself from fraud